Clay Atkins Update – July 9th

Binh Thanh/Hong Ha/An Hoa medical team member Clay Atkins will be leaving Bunramgrad Hospital in Bangkok later this week. He has been a patient there since June 16, after suffering a stroke in his Danang hotel room the day before. tens electrical stimulation machine

Clay and Jakie, along with a nurse, are tentatively scheduled to fly commercially from Bangkok to Tokyo to San Francisco and to Boise sometime this weekend. Clay will enter a special facility at a hospital in Boise upon arrival.

His doctor informed Jakie of his decision, based solely on Clay’s medical and health progress, yesterday. VWAM learned of this positive development overnight.

Let’s keep Clay and Jakie in our prayers this week. Please pray specifically for continuing medical progress and health improvement, no problems with financial and/or airline arrangements, and a comfortable no issues travel experience!

More news will be posted on the blog when available.

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Team Home Safe and Sound

Just a brief note to let everyone know all Hoa Hai & Hoa Heip Nam team members have made it home, or are on their way this morning.

The Asianna Airlines crash delayed several team members but Sam Tate, Linda Avery and Steve Scott were home by midnight last night. Unfortunately, Allison Bungardas was on the tarmac/taxiway when the accident happened, and they were sent back to the gate. She had to overnight again in San Franciso, and just left for Detroit this morning (Sunday). Joette and I got out at 7am and arrived home about 7pm last night.

Joette and Jakie are messaging back and forth this morning here/night in Bangkok. The latest on Clay is that he is making progress, even taking a few steps on his own, but it is deliberate and incremental improvements.

This morning when you go to church to praise and worship our Savoir, ask Him to touch the lives of Clay and Jakie as well as the lives of all those affected by the Asianna Airlines accident yesterday…

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Parting Is Such Sweet, Sweet Sorrow

At this very moment the Hoa Heip Nam medical team is in transit and actually at the airport in Taipei, Taiwan. Most of the team are at Starbucks and Burger King.

The one hour flight from DAD to SGN was uneventful, as was the three hour flight here. In a couple of hours the team will go in three different directions, and there will be misty eyes for sure. While most of the team heads to San Francisco, Marie (Vu) flies to Los Angeles, and Tammy (Nguyen) as well as Christine (Loung) will head to Seattle.

Marie had most of the team concerned because she didn’t show-up at the gate until twenty-five minutes before the flight. She had waited to meet family from Saigon, who were to meet her about 12:30 this afternoon at the International terminal. Unfortunately a traffic policeman stopped them on their way to the airport, and it took about an hour to resolve the issue by finally giving him “Coffee money.” That made their family visitation time fall way behind schedule, and Marie late.

This is the part of the trip that most team members have mixed emotions. I, for one, look forward to getting back to sleepy, quiet, clean Newberry. On the other hand, I will miss this team and already think about how long it will be before I see Chinh at the board meeting in Oakland. Speaking of Chinh.

I received a phone call from him before leaving Tan Son Nhut letting me know that Thien and Vy, his two children, received visa’s from the US Consulate! They had interviews earlier today. All four of them will come to the US late this summer to visit family in CA, AL, and FL. Then Ha and the children will return in time for school, and Chinh will remain until after the board meeting.

But now it’s time to say “Goodbye” to Marie, Tammy, and Christine. Sometimes God puts special people in your life, and I am grateful He led these three young women to VWAM. I’m really going to miss them. All I can say about them is…

“Sup Totes!”

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Typhoon, Porcupine, Nurses, Vets and Clay Atkins

Vets honored at dinner: Sam Tate, Doug Braendel, Rhea McCarthy and Mike Connolly (All Army); Steve Scott, Marines: Bill Jenkins, Army; and Chuck Ward (Cento of photo, Navy),

Vets honored at dinner: Sam Tate (Air Force); Doug Braendel, Rhea McCarthy and Mike Connolly (All Army); Steve Scott, Marines: Bill Jenkins, Army; and Chuck Ward (Center of photo, Navy).

Last night was the traditional dinner in honor of all the veterans on the team. VWAM had gotten photo’s of all each of them when they were in Vietnam or military service. The team surprised them with personal notes and expressions of thanks for their service on the back of each one.

Triage is one of those duties on the team where everyone bonds. It  is not an easy job, with hour after hour of interviewing patients. This group below did an outstanding job, and several plan to participate again.

Tammy Nguyen, Marie Vu, Christine Luong, Rhea McCarthy, Steve Scott and Allison Bungardas.

Tammy Nguyen, Marie Vu, Christine Luong, Rhea McCarthy, Steve Scott and Allison Bungardas.

Speaking of Nurse, soon to be Nurse Practitioner, Marie Vu. Did you notice the “Floaties” on her arms? Here’s the story.

Early on in the team experience, after a day of sweating in those high temps and humidity, a number of the gals decided to go to the pool after clinic. Marie was on of them. She walked into the infinity pool at the Furama, and began to wade out to the center of it. The pool slowly slopes from shallow to deeper, and soon Marie was splashing about like a baby bird in its nest. Her fellow team members saw her in distress, but didn’t react immediately. Soon it was apparent, Marie couldn’t swim! She thought the pool was shallow and same depth all the way across.

She did such an outstanding job, VWAM wanted to make sure she’s around to go on another trip. Thus, the PFD’s (Personal Floatation Devices) for her to use on lakes, pools, rivers, ponds, oceans, and in the bathtub. Oh, Marie. these PFD’s are not USCG approved. I don’t think they are even Vietnam Coast Guard approved!

Our interpreters were given their salary last night and invited to participate in the dinner – a first in VWAM history. They were such a special group and half of them were Christians. Some even chosen interesting nicknames like Typhoon” and “Porcupine,” but here they are with the person they translated with: Hanh (Porcupine) – Kim, Thanh – Allison, Phuong – Dr. Bill, Thuong (Typhoon) – Mike, Phap – Marie, Han – Steve, and Linh – Christine.

Clay Atkins Update & Personal Note from Jakie: “…Thank you for the ticket info and I will ask Dr. Roekchai for the tens device
letter when I see him today. John and I will be talking later in the
week. He still thinks it would be wise for us to not fly completely on
our own. I’ll get details from the person who came yesterday. She may
have thought that we need to fly independently because of the expense.

Dear Nhan writes every day. She heard from someone how much it mightcost for us to fly home and she was so concerned. I told her that Godhas supplied every need we have had so far and He will continue to doso–I am not worried and she doesn’t need to be either. God is giving
very natural openings to share His love.

Your last day should be busy and rewarding. I guess all the team
members can then relax, but I know you will not be able to do so until
you get back to the States. Then you need to remember to get some
rest. Things at the office can wait.

I did pay the hotel bill up to the present. I also extended my
reservation for another week, but told them I might be checking out
sooner and that I would let them know as soon as I found out the
details. They have been wonderful to deal with.

Love to you and Joette. I don’t know how I would have managed withoutyou, the Lord, and all the people He’s brought alongside to help…”

Let’s continue to remember Clay. He continues to make slow, deliberate, incremental progress at one of the best hospitals in the world.

Please pray for Clay Atkins, Jakie and their family.

Please pray for Clay Atkins, Jakie and their family.

This is the last entry on the blog for the Hoa Heip Nam medical team. Thank you, team members, your compliment is Matthew 25:21…

 

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A Breakthrough

Literally, that is, just ask Sam Tate.

The floor gave way and he nearly toppled over on a startled Mamsan waiting to see the doctor.

The floor gave way and he nearly toppled over on a startled Mamsan waiting to see the doctor.

The Hoa Heip Nam Clinic is due for relocation in August, and this may be one of the reasons. The property actually has been sold to a developer, and the facility will be rebuilt about a kilometer or so west of its present location.

Bent but not broken, leaving the clinic with her meds.

Bent but not broken, leaving the clinic with her meds.

It was another hot and humid day. While the temperature was down slightly from the day before, the humidity was up, and another team member became dehydrated and had to be sent back to the hotel.  It’s apparent VWAM must take a closer look at the physical condition and age of future team members. Individuals have fallen at the clinic, tripped and fell over when walking (Is there a level sidewalk in Vietnam?), even getting in and out of vans as well as taken falls at the clinics. We’re not getting any younger.

Joette with Lai. She was a 11 year-old girl selling sea shells and other trinkets on the beach by the Non Nouc Hotel in 1994. A Mother-Daughter like friendship began then that has endured time. Lai now volunteers as an interpreter!

Joette with Lai. She was a 11 year-old girl selling sea shells and other trinkets on the beach by the Non Nuoc Hotel in 1994. A Mother-Daughter like friendship began then that has endured time. Lai now volunteers as an interpreter!

Triage processed and Dr. Bill, with NP to be Marie, saw 88 patients yesterday. We could have seen many more but the clinic director, and our request to hire a Vietnamese doctor, peaked little interest in helping us. Unfortunately, this meant almost 70 patients had to be turned away. Well, almost.

Cerebral Palsy - She bought her son thinking, hoping the American doctors could cure him.

Cerebral Palsy – She bought her son thinking, hoping the American doctors could cure him.

Those patients were mostly from the Leper Colony Church who came after lunch on this the final clinic day. It was heartbreaking, but a physician can only see 4-6 patients an hour. You do the math, and you can see how many Docs’ are actually needed on a team. These patients, however, all received eyeglasses and  dental kit. Also, VWAM made a commitment to have one day dedicated and reserved to the Leper Colony Church on its next medical team visit to Danang.

The lepers came not because of their disease, but other ailments. The pastor of the church is a friend of Chinh. They were together in the refugee camp in Hong Kong.

The lepers came not because of their disease, but other ailments. The pastor of the church is a friend of Chinh. They were together in the refugee camp in Hong Kong.

This team gave away over a dozen canes, ten walkers, three pairs of crutches, and twenty-one wheelchairs (That’s fifty on two teams at by five clinics). That’s the most ever.

Been triaged, had dental check and eyeglasses evaluation, now waiting their turn to see the doctor.

Been triaged, had dental check and eyeglasses evaluation, now waiting their turn to see the doctor.

While the third heart patient didn’t materialize, the funds that would have gone to such a patient will help a young boy with surgery that will repair a condition affecting his ability to urinate and procreate. It will change his life and future lives. His Mother was very grateful for this sponsorship!

Let's keep the family name going!

Let’s keep the family name going!

Enjoy more photo’s from the last day…

Kids in Vietnam are the same as kids in the US.

Kids in Vietnam are the same as kids in the US.

Hey you! Sharon (Patient Services), Christine (Triage Nurse), Stephanie (Pharmacist) and Ivan (USMC - Security)!

Hey you! Sharon (Patient Services), Christine (Triage Nurse), Stephanie (Pharmacist) and Ivan (USMC – Security)!

 

Hey you, too. Four of the best interpreters in Vietnam!

Hey you, too. Four of the best interpreters in Vietnam!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who are these peoole? They don;t look like me!

Who are these people? They don;t look like me!

 

 

 

 

 

 

VWAM's van drivers work very hard loading and unloading, running errands, getting our water and icing it down in coolers, transporting us safely. Tuan, Van Leader, does a great job!

VWAM’s van drivers work very hard loading and unloading, running errands, getting our water and icing it down in coolers, transporting us safely. Tuan, Van Leader, does a great job!

 

 

 

 

 

What's missing from the team photo? You! Sign-up for a 2014 trip.

What’s missing from the team photo? You! Sign-up for a 2014 trip.

One more blog entry to go…

 

 

 

 

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Hoa Heip Nam Clinic Day Two

Steve Scott, Dr. Huynh Ba Tan, Allison Bungardas & Dr. Quang Ngo during their visit to the Women's Center For Reproductive Health on Monday.

Steve Scott, Dr. Huynh Ba Tan, Allison Bungardas & Dr. Quang Ngo during their visit to the Women’s Center For Reproductive Health on Monday.

The first rain that I’ve seen, since I’ve been in Danang, finally arrived yesterday evening. It was a nice break from the heat and humidity. This morning the temps were lower because of this new weather front, and after Linda (Avery’s/TX) devotion, the team arrived here at 8:00 a.m.  The second day at Hoa Heip Nam Clinic was pretty much uneventful with eighty-five patients, but with little special patient activity for once. Tomorrow that will be a different story, as Pastor Phong came to see me this morning.

VWAM, with two teams this summer, is on pace to give away fifty wheelchairs over to teams!

VWAM, with two teams this summer, is on pace to give away fifty wheelchairs over to teams!

 He is head of the Leper Colony Church, and on Wednesday he will bring sixty lepers to our clinic. Originally, the government granted permission for VWAM to go to the colony and work out of the church. But evidently, the more the government thought about it, the more they didn’t like the idea. Someone said the church shouldn’t get credit for the VWAM team coming, so that permission was rescinded. They had to bring the lepers to Hoa Heip Nam Clinic. When Pastor Phong reminded them that many are disabled and cannot travel, their answer was, “That’s your problem, not ours.”

Our "Special Patient" today. This boy needs twelve months of blood transfusions. The family really can't afford it, so VWAM will sponsor them. Dad and son look quite happy with the news.

Our “Special Patient” today. This boy needs twelve months of blood transfusions. The family really can’t afford it, so VWAM will sponsor them. Dad and son look quite happy with the news.

So, VWAM will solve the problem. I told the pastor we’ll send a van over, he can load them up, and that van will bring them over here to the clinic. Then we’ll get our wheelchairs and move them around wherever they need to go. When done, we’ll take them all back by van and do the process all over again for the next group. Khong Sao!

Mamasans waiting for their turn to go to triage, doctor.

Mamasans waiting for their turn to go to triage, doctor.

While we are, In fact, still waiting for our third heart patient candidate, there is an interesting story behind that.

Tammy Tran is a successful businesswoman and lawyer in Houston, TX. A friend of team member Doug Braendel, he and his wife Cami befriended Tammy and her family when the fled Vietnam after the war. Over the years the Braendel’s continued to assist and remain in touch with Tammy, and a wonderful friendship developed between them.

When Tammy learned of Doug’s upcoming trip to Danang, she became very interested in it, especially the Patient Services & Medicine Fund and its Children’s Heart Surgery Program. Doug’s team had a $7,700 goal to raise funds for medicines, etc. and another $9,300 goal for heart operations ($3,100 each or three operations).

Doug Braendel, earlier this week, with a wheelchair recipient.

Doug Braendel, earlier this week, with a wheelchair recipient.

Tammy generously sponsored two of those operations, or $6,200 before Doug left on this team. She thought she was done, but the Lord had other plans for her.

She called Doug just before he was to leave the US, and told him that God told her in a dream that she was to sponsor a third heart operation. However, cash flow was a little tight at that time, and she didn’t know what to do! But, as always, if God wants you to do something, He will provide the way. As a famous missionary once said, “God’s work, done in God’s time, will never lack God’s provision.” I think that was Hudson Taylor?

Soon Tammy got hold of Doug to let him know that the Houston Trial Lawyers Association would be sending a $3,000+ check to Vets With A Mission, and even though VWAM was in Vietnam, could we get to that money to use it for a heart operation? The answer was, of course, and arrangements were made. Now we’re looking, waiting, for the third child in need of a life-changing, possibly life-saving heart procedure.

Since she didn’t show up today, we’re looking forward to meeting him or her tomorrow, as well as our friends from the Leper Church!

Jeremiah 29:11

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104 and 104

It was 104 today and that is also the number of patients seen on the first day at Hoa Heip Nam Clinic.

"Oh the stories she could tell of years gone by!"

“Oh the stories she could tell of years gone by!”

With only one physician, Dr. Bill Jenkins (ME), and a soon to be certified Nurse Practitioner, Marie Vu (CA) assisting him, the two of them saw an amazing number of patients. I believe the Maine Academy of Family Physicians should be very proud of their colleague. However, VWAM’s patient examiners did have help this afternoon from Bac Si (Dr.) Deim, a local physician recruited to deal with the large numbers of patients.

Bac Si Deim with one of the 104 patients seen on Monday.

Bac Si Deim with one of the 104 patients seen on Monday.

The last team van with Pharmacy, Patient Examiners and their interpreters, arrived at the hotel around 6:30 p.m. That makes for a eleven hour day, and to think they each paid to do this shows how dedicated the team is to serving!

One of today's "Special patients."

One of today’s “Special patients.”

Every single one of these patients were given dental hygiene kits and instructions. About half of these patients were elderly, and many received reading eyeglasses.

Interpreter Nga, with Nurse/Vet Rhea McCarthy, fitting a patient with reading eyeglasses.

Interpreter Nga, with Nurse/Vet Rhea McCarthy, fitting a patient with reading eyeglasses donated by Lions International.

One of the more interesting special patients today was Phuoc, a former ARVN Lieutenant, who lost his right leg in 1968. VWAM was able to see that he received a new prosthesis, one properly fitted for his stump. His current prosthesis was provided in 2007 by a humanitarian team from Poland. The one before that was given to him in 1975.

Phuoc showing Triage Coordinator Steve Scott his soon to be old prosthesis.

Phuoc showing Triage Coordinator Steve Scott his soon to be “old” prosthesis.

Enjoy a few more photo’s from the first day of clinic at Hoa Heip Nam, Lien Chieu District, in Danang City:

"Adapt, improvise and  execute" or something like that, as Marine Ivan Cheung (HI) McGyvered a special inhaler contraption out of a discarded water bottle and actual inhaler for one young patient.

“Adapt, improvise and execute” or something like that, as Marine Ivan Cheung (HI) McGyvered a special inhaler contraption out of a discarded water bottle and actual inhaler for one young patient.

 

 

 

 

 

The view from the clinic's courtyard.

The view from the clinic’s courtyard. That’s Linda Avery (TX) with her interpreter.

Nam is being assisted by a Danang City policeman (In blue shirt) in assembling a new wheelchair.

Nam is being assisted by a Danang City policeman (In blue shirt) in assembling a new wheelchair.

 

 

 

 

Nurse Allison Bungardas in her best Kim Khardashian pose!

Nurse Allison Bungardas in her best Kim Khardashian pose!

DSC_0358

Some patients waited 3 hours to see Dr. Bill.

These patients, and the ones above, waited up to three hours to see Dr. Bill.

Tomorrow another one hundred patients, divided equally into a.m. and p.m. groups, will be seen beginning at 8:00 a.m.  Come back again in twenty-four hours or so to read and view the latest!

Triage at work: Steve (FL), Christine (WA) and Allison (PA).

Triage at work: Steve (FL), Christine (WA) and Allison (PA).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hoa Heip Nam Clinic Tomorrow

It’s Sunday morning back in the US, and Monday will be the first day of VWAM’s second clinic. One hundred patients are expected each day through Wednesday.

Most team members are returning from dinner at the Furama, or from going out to eat in Danang. Doug (Braendel) and Sam (Tate) returned about 4:30 this afternoon from a weekend visit to Tuy Hoa (6.5 hours south of here). I think it was the place where Dr. Tate served during the war.

Earlier this morning about ten team members attended Sunday service at the Danang International Fellowship, where Vietnam vet and Pastor Bob Huff presented the message.

Sometime this week the team will probably see some lepers from a facility near the clinic where they’re working. It’s not for leprosy, but for other ailments. These are the lepers that used to be on the beach not far from Hai Van Pass. They were moved to the outskirts of the city after the government sold the land, where they had been located since before the war, to a resort developer.

Another thing happening tomorrow is a visit to the Women’s Center For Reproductive Health by Nurse Coordinator/Board member Steve Scott and Nurse/team member Allison Bungardas. She is working on her MSRN and this visit is part of her course work toward that degree. The WCFRH was renovated in 2010 by Vets With A Mission, in exchange for the training of local church members in pre-abortion counseling by an international pro-life ministry. Prior to, VWAM had been approached by the Center’s director Dr. Huynh Ba Tan, MD, to help them with their abortion problem – too many of them. It has been a win-win situation for all concerned.

Please come back tomorrow for a report with photo’s on the team’s first day at Hoa Heip Nam

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Clay Atkins Update

Pray for Clay Atkins, Jakie and their family.

Pray for Clay Atkins, Jakie and their family.

Clay remains in Bunramgrad Hospital in Bangkok, where he arrived by air ambulance on June 16, exactly two weeks from today. Clay suffered a major stroke in his hotel room on June 15.

Clay is having good and not so good days, nights of rest and restlessness, and Jakie remains at his side regardless of the emotional and physical toll that must be affecting her daily. While we do not know how things will work-out for Clay’s health, we do know he is getting the very best care at this world-class hospital. The medical goal is to get Clay healthy enough to travel commercially home, but that may not happen. If so, they are looking at another expensive and exhausting medical evacuation flight to the US.

Please keep Clay, Jakie and their family in your prayers.

Another Atkins update will posted before this second team leaves Vietnam on July 5…

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Extra Mile Award

Joette Ward "The Queen" with a grateful patient. VWAM  special ordered medicine for her that she couldn't afford,  but needed, according to our doctors.

Joette Ward “The Queen” with a grateful patient. VWAM special ordered medicine for her that she couldn’t afford, but needed, according to our doctors.

Sometimes Chinh, VWAM’s in-country Coordinator, gives out an “Extra Mile Award” to team members for exceptional performance. Today the entire team deserved one.

Patients arriving and already in line at eight o'clock.

Patients arriving and already in line at eight o’clock.

Having arrived before 8:00 a.m., the team saw their last patient at 6:00 p.m. They even worked through lunch, taking only an hour break with half the team going at 11:30 and the other at 12:45, all so that all patients assigned could be seen on this final day. And it was only 98 today with a heat index of 105. Khong Sao!

Chinh explaining the arrangements to the Mother of her child, a probabe special patient.

Chinh explaining the arrangements to the Mother of her child, a probabe special patient.

Nearly a hundred patients were seen, the actual number was 97, which met Triage, Patient Examiners, Security/Patient Services and Pharmacy went the “Extra Mile.” Yesterday the team lost Sam Tate for the entire day, and yesterday afternoon Mike Connolly was out. When it’s hot, humid, and you’re inside a concrete building with fifty or sixty bodies shoulder to shoulder, this is what dehydration will do to you! The team went through, in addition to what each person brought for themselves at the start of the day, six cases of bottled water (24 to a case or 144 bottles for twenty-five individuals).

Doug Braendel with his interpreter, "Typhoon," keeping order on the second-floor as patients go through being triage and see a physician.

Doug Braendel with his interpreter, “Typhoon” and Sharon Connolly just visible, keeping order on the second-floor as patients go through triage and wait to see a physician.

The last day at a clinic is called “Desperation Day,” because the local Vietnamese already know, through the “Jungle telegraph,” that the team won’t be back for at least a year and a half. That means the team goes the “Extra Mile” to make sure as many patients are examined as is possible. Often it means God sends us a “Special patient” for us to show His love. You see, it’s never about us but always about “Him and Them.” Meet one of “Them.”

"Phuoc"

“Phuoc”

The love of a Mother is incredible. She brought her son to see the American doctors in hopes they could help him.

Mother Tuyen with her son. She had to carry him everywhere they went.

Mother Tuyen with her son. She had to carry him everywhere they went. The man in the dark shirt receiving him is her husband, who is blind.

His condition came a birth, commonly referred to as “Water on the brain,” it should have been easily taken care of at that time. For whatever reason whether it was  politics, ideology or money, nothing was done and this is the result.

What would you say her facial expression says?

What would you say her facial expression says?

There wasn’t much our doctors and nurses could do, but a wheelchair would make life a bit easier for Mom. So, Nam began putting one together once he received the order.

Wheelchair Tech, Nam. He assembles 5-10 chairs a day.

Wheelchair Tech, Nam. He assembles 5-10 chairs a day.

Now more mobile, it will be easier for Phuoc's Mother to move him around.

Now more mobile, it will be easier for Phuoc’s Mother to move him around.

This is a bitter, sweet day. Bitter because the team will lose Dr. Vu Nghiem, USN, a man’s man serving with the Marines. He will not be with us next week. Vu loves the people and loves the Lord. He has been such a blessing!

Vu doing what he likes best - doctoring and serving people - especially his Marines!

Vu doing what he likes best – doctoring and serving people – especially his Marines!

And it’s a sweet day because we welcome a new team member, Ivan Cheung, a “Mustang who has risen to officer” in the USMC. Ivan is the fiance of Pharmacist Stephanie Phan. He has requested permission to come aboard.

"Permission granted to come aboard." Someone is happy to see you!

“Permission granted to come aboard, Ivan.” I think someone is happy to see you!

Finally, this is the built-in long weekend to get everyone rested and ready to go full-speed beginning Monday. Half the team is in Hue today, first stop, Mr. Cu’s Mandarin Cafe, of course. Others have gone to Tuy Hoa to check out their old stomping grounds during the war, and the rest of the team is enjoying the Furama Resort.

That’s what Joette and I will do. Relax, swim at the pool or beach, possibly head to Hoi An this evening. Tomorrow we want to see the new dragon bridge at night because at 9:00 p.m. it shoots fire out of it’s mouth! No, I’m not kidding. It’s DIF (Danang International Fellowship) on Sunday with more rest and relaxation. That’s just what team medical leader Dr. Bill prescribed!

And we have to follow doctors orders…

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